Chef Marie Seared Scallops, Citrus Butter Sauce and Fried Shallots


This is a huge treat for anybody who is a fan of scallop dishes! This is a recipe that make MCHEF popular with Foodies and Connoisseurs! It's a must to make it at home! To do for your loved ones this weekend. Try this! Easy and Delicious! The wine pairing is Chablis, mineral, crispy chilled wine...One of my classic entry's favorite! 

This amazing recipe is gluten-free!

4 servings / 15 minutes

Ingredients

12 large scallops, remove the small nerve on the side! (standard size U8)

1 tbsp (15 ml) of grape seed oil

2 shallots, finely chopped

1 tsp (5 g) of the MCHEF® MADAGASCAR 

3 tbsp (45 ml) of softened butter

1 navel orange or blood (zest and juice)

1 lemon (zest and juice)

Preparation

1.In a large skillet over high heat, drizzle oil and add a knob of butter. Brown the shallots and sprinkle at

   the end the MCHEF® MADAGASCAR. Transfer to a small bowl. Set aside.

2.Zest the orange and lemon and squeeze the juice into another bowl. Set aside.

3.Using a paper towel, absorb as much water as possible to the surface of the scallops. In the same large

   skillet over high heat, drizzle oil and add a knob of butter and sear the scallops so that they do not

   touch.

4.Color 30 sec. on each side to get a nice golden coloration, then place them on a plate covered with

   paper towels. Deglaze the pan with the mixture of citrus juice. Reduce to the third (1/3).

5.Add the fried shallots and bind butter until a smooth, glossy sauce.

6.Serve scallops on warm plates (3 scallops on each plate) and pour citrus butter sauce. Serve with

    a lemony mache salad. Enjoy!


How to choose scallops? Avoid shiny, wet and/or soft ones, just like when buying any other fish. Secondly, you should be buying fewer than ten scallops per pound (“U/8” is a kicky way of saying “under 8”) — each should weigh around 1½ or 1¾ ounces. Finally, you don't want to buy scallops that smell like, well, scallops.

Wild vs. Farmed? Scallop farming is just starting to take off in North America; most scallops sold here are wild-caught. American farmers are using Japanese techniques to bolster their harvests, so expect to see more farmed scallops in markets soon.